Dunham Massey is Stamford Military Hospital

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to visit Dunham Massey with a National Trust group. Dunham has done something pretty amazing and transformed what was a very standard Trust Stately Home into the military Hospital it actually was during the First World War. I had read quite a bit about ‘Sanctuary’ as the theme is called so when my line manager asked if I wanted to go and see it I jumped at the chance!

Dunham Massey

Dunham Massey

The best bit about going to see it with work (other than getting to go on a jolly and it being called ‘work’) was that after we had been round the house we had the opportunity to talk to the team behind sanctuary. It was really inspiring to see what could be done with a good idea, a fascinating story, and a lot of money!

The new Visitor Reception Building

The new Visitor Reception Building

During the First World War Dunham Massey, like many stately homes, was turned into a military hospital to help ease the burden that the War had placed on the under-prepared British health care system. At the beginning of the war Britain had only 7000 hospital bed, by the end there were 364000 thanks to Dunham Massey and other places like it.

From 1917, when it opened as a hospital, Dunham Massey was known as Stamford Military Hospital. The hospital was established and run by The Countess of Stamford, Penelope Grey. The ground floor became the hospital but the upper floors remained the family home, where all the furniture that had been in the rooms below rooms was also stored for the duration of the war.

The Bagdad Ward

The Bagdad Ward

The Countess took a personal interest in all the soldiers under her roof, and her daughter Lady Jane Grey became a VAD Nurse working at the hospital, and bringing great comfort to the wounded soldiers. Penelope’s son, Roger Grey, the 10th Earl of Stamford, was based in London for most of the war and used his position to help get supplies the hospital needed.

The interpretation of Dunham’s amazing story has been really well done, with the ‘Bagdad Ward’ in the Saloon being the highlight of the tour in my opinion. The room has been recreated according to contemporary photographs of the hospital. There are snippets of information all over the room, so many that you have to really explore the space to find it all.

Some of the hidden interpretation

Some of the hidden interpretation

The Visitor Reception Building had several panels of information about Dunham’s role in the First World War, and background information about the major changes that the national hospital system underwent during the War. There was also an introductory exhibition in one of the first rooms of the house, giving basic information about life in the Trenches and some of the injuries and illnesses that could send fighting men ‘back to Blighty’.

The introductory information

The introductory information

We were the first people in that day (eager beavers us Trust lot) so we have a chance to be in the room before the actors came in. There are sound effects of breathing, whistling, ringing phones and even music in the downstairs rooms which help create the atmosphere of the place. Being in that space was really absorbing. When the actors came in the room at first I wasn’t sure what to do. We had already been warned that they would not interact with us (thank goodness, audience participation terrifies me!) and I wanted to read all the information, which meant venturing near one of the actors who was lying in a bed.

The actor portraying Lady Jane Grey

The actor portraying Lady Jane Grey

However once I got past the slight awkwardness and just carried on looking it was fine, and then the actors started one of their vignettes. There are several different scripts and I have heard really good things about them. The two I saw were very good, you had to have a bit of background knowledge to fully understand the meaning of the conversation the two soldiers were having. If you did have this knowledge it was very though provoking.

Actors doing a scene

Actors doing a scene

However after hearing so many good things about how powerful and moving the acting was I came out of the property a little disappointed, knowing that there were elements I had not seen. We even went in the first couple of rooms again at the end of the day to try to catch some more acting, but again did not see the really emotive scenes we had heard about. I guess this is where ‘managing expectations’ really becomes important. I was a little bitter that Sanctuary was getting so much press but have now decided maybe it’s not a bad thing Hardwick it not in the public focus in such a big way. It is a lot to live up to, especially when the icing on the cake is something like Sanctuary’s acting, where it is very time dependent on the experience you will get.

This has turned into a really long post so I will leave it there for now and talk more about my visit to Dunham in the next post. Thanks for reading!

Another Nostell Visit

Last week I went to stay with mother in Marsden for a bit of R&R which was lovely, and while I was there we did a bit of Trust visiting too. I decided I really wanted visit Nostell Priory again, I had been there in January for the Housekeeping Study Days but I hadn’t seen it open and ready for the public.

Nostell Priory

Nostell Priory

We managed to drive there without getting too lost and when we got there were loads of ’50 Things’ activities taking place in the Estate, and hundreds of cows! It was lovely to see the Estate in use, and full of people. Nostell Priory, the house that stands today, was built by the Winn family in the 1700’s.

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The 18th Century Saloon

The thing I was most taken with in January were the amazing plaster and painted ceilings, they are so beautiful, with really intricate details and colors including gilded parts.Rowland Winn, the 5th Baronet took over the building and decorating of the house from his father, and he hired Robert Adam to do much of the work on the interiors, including many of the ceilings.

The Dining Room

The  State Dining Room

The collection of objects and furniture at Nostell is amazing, they have so many beautiful things! Much of the furniture was made by Thomas Chippendale specially for Rowland and this house.

A Leather Chair

An embossed Leather Chair

Seeing all the rooms properly the whole effect was stunning! I can’t decided which was my favorite room, but it could very possibly be the State Bedroom, which has beautiful hand painted wallpaper, installed in 1771 and matching furniture, as well as this stunning hand embroidered bed spread! The guide said it was believed to have all been worked by one person. The bed itself was installed in the room in the 19th Century and designed to match the existing Chippendale furniture.

The bed spread from the Chinese Bedroom

The bed spread from the State Bedroom

I love being able to just get in the car and drive to different places, and working for the Trust means as a reward we get in for free so it makes for a brilliant day out! I have been to quite a few different properties lately and plan to go to a lot more when the re-enactment season is over (not that I’m wishing it away of course!).

Designed by Robert Adam

The Tapestry Room

The last room on the tour of the house was a mini exhibition on how the House Team look after Nostell, and it was really well done. It talked about the agents of decay, and had examples of each, as well as a mini room set out to show what a Deep Clean of a stately home looks like. This was all in the room which also house an amazing Doll’s House, decorated inside to match the rooms of the main house!

A lovely Doll's House at Nostell Priory

The lovely Doll’s House at Nostell Priory

The Doll’s House was made for the Winn family in 1735 by Thomas Chippendale. I can imagine the hours of fun the Winn family children must have had playing with such a beautiful thing!

Nostell has a very different feel from Hardwick, but it too is really beautiful, with an amazing collection. I bet there House Team feel just as lucky to work there as I do to be at Hardwick!

 

 

 

 

A Stunning Spanish Sight

Apologies for the lack of posting recently; after my mad month in June I was lucky enough to go on holiday to Spain with my mother, for some well-earned R&R.

The street in Novelda  that houses the Casa-Museo Modernista

The street in Novelda that houses the Casa-Museo Modernista

The one active day of our holiday we went to visit a beautiful house in the town of Novelda, called Casa-Museo Modernistsica. Mum had visited before but I had never been and had heard how beautiful it was.

Casa-Museo Modernista

Casa-Museo Modernista

The house was built by Antonia Navarro Mira after she inherited a significant sum of money from her father when she was 40. She bought up six houses next to one another, knocked them down to build her mansion.

The central staircase

The Central Staircase

A close up of the Stair Case

A close up of the Stair Case

She employed the architect Pedro Cerdan Martinez Murcia to design her dream home in a modern style, with a stylish exterior and interior that had all the mod’ cons!

The Internal Balconies

The Internal Balconies

The house was finished in 1903 and held the wedding of Antonia’s youngest daughter Louise for its first big event.

The Outside Courtyard

The Outside Courtyard

The house was occupied up until the Spanish Civil War in 1936 when the family left for Madrid, taking with them their furniture which was of significant value.

The Beautiful Interior Decor

The Beautiful Interior Decor

After the war the house was used as a school for girls run by nuns, who painted the walls white. In doing this, they preserved the original decoration of the house. The house was opened as a museum in 1980.

The Ceiling in the Center of the House

The Ceiling above the Staircase

Whilst we were visiting the house and admiring its beauty a group of children came into the house and started singing in the Entrance Hall, which filled the central foyer with wonderful sounds. I think it was to do with a festival taking place and everyone stood round in a circle joining in by clapping along to the rhythm of the song.

One of the Bed Rooms

One of the Bed Rooms

This little impromptu act really brought the house to life, and it made me really want to bring more music to Hardwick. When we had a flash-mob singing the Eglantine Lamentation in the High Great Chamber it was beautiful and i would love to do some more similar thing, especially when we have our Living the History group in the Hall!

The Glass in the Center of the Ceiling

The Glass in the Center of the Ceiling

The Casa-Museo Modernista is such a stunning building, amazing interior decoration, and beautifully maintained still. Antonia’s story reminds me so much of Bess and Hardwick’s story too, I love imagining these visionary women taking their passion, going out into the world and leaving their mark on it! I would recommend it to anyone in the area! I hope I can visit it again, and that the atmosphere is just as alive the next time I go.

Penelope Returns, and Lucretia Leaves

It has been a very exciting (and busy!) couple of weeks at Hardwick as we have been getting ready to open a new exhibition highlighting our ‘Great Hanging’ embroideries. Many, many months ago (three years actually) the first of the Great Hangings went away to Blickling Conservation Studios for conservation work. This is the start of a long-term conservation project for Hardwick. The Blickling Textile Conservation Studio Blog has lots of interesting info and nice pics of the conservation work they did on Penelope.

Penelope

Penelope

Eventually all four beautiful works of this set will be displayed in the Hall in a new exhibition that is being created specifically for this project. They are going to be displayed in the Butler’s Pantry, that used to house an introductory exhibition about Hardwick Estate. The past couple of weeks we have been focusing in installing Penelope in this space and getting it ready to open to the public.

The Empty Exhibition Space

The Empty Exhibition Space

I was not working at Hardwick when Penelope went away for conservation, but remember seeing the hanging on display in their screens in the Entrance Hall. Duchess Evelyn placed the embroideries in these screens, where previously they had been displayed on giant A-Frames, and prior to that hung on walls. Now it has reached the point where these virtuous ladies really need some TLC.

Taking Penelope out of her packaging

Taking Penelope out of her packaging

Penelope returned to Hardwick at the beginning of the month, and we brought her into the newly refurbished Butler’s Pantry to await the arrival of her custom-made display case. The vision for the Butler’s Pantry has been to turn it into a really absorbing gallery space where your attention is focused solely in Penelope and eventually the rest of the Great Hangings.

Un-rolling

Un-rolling

The Great Hangings were created by Bess out of clerical vestments her husbands collected from their involvement in the dissolution of the monasteries. Originally there were five hangings, each featuring a strong woman from history or mythology that Bess admired. The five women originally featured in the five hangings were Penelope, Lucretia, Artemisia, Zenobia and Cleopatra. I love that Bess herself has now joined the ranks of these women, and is a role model to others as these five were to her!

Lining the embroidery up with the frame

Lining the embroidery up with the frame

Penelope was the wife of Odysseus (also knows as Ulysses). It took Odysseus 10 years to return from the Trojan War, all the while Penelope waited for his return, not knowing if he was alive or dead. During this time she was harangued by many suitors wanting her hand in marriage. She told the suitors that she would marry once she had finished weaving a shroud for her father-in-law. So every day Penelope sat at her loom and carried on her weaving, and every night when she was alone she un-wove the work she has just done so the task would never be completed. Eventually Odysseus did return and rid his home of the suitors that had been taking advantage of his lands and possessions for too long, and he and Penelope were joyfully reunited!

Going up!

Going up!

Penelope is depicted alongside Patients and Perseverance on our hanging, two virtues she definitely displayed and that Bess must have admired. The tapestries hanging in the High Great Chamber also depict Penelope as the follow the story of Odysseus (Ulysses) returning from Troy. I studied the Odyssey at A-Level and think it is a really interesting story full of myth and magic, fantastic creatures and plenty of danger! Worth a read if you enjoy mythology and adventure.

Penelope gets a final spruce

Penelope gets a final spruce

Her display case has been fitted with perspex panes as large as we could get them, so as to interfere with the piece as little as possible. It has also been chosen to reduce and reflections so visitors can see Penelope clearly. It works really well and you barely notice it is there, I just hope we don’t get sticky fingers touching it as removing fingerprints off our display cases seems to be an endless job already (I don’t know how people in museums cope!).

Un covering the perspex

Un-covering the perspex

As well as her custom-made display case Penelope has had state of the are LED lighting fitted overhead, set specially to pick out the wonderful colour that still remains in the piece. Each embroidery is made a church vestments, this mean each piece of the image is made from the most fantastic fabrics, velvet and brocades covered in gold and silver threads and spangles! I have been doing a detailed condition check of the piece and keep getting distracted by the way the detail had been created, there is so much to see!

The detail on the eagle held by Perseverance

The detail on the eagle held by Perseverance

I am so pleased to have been involved with this project, in the small way I have been, and so proud of the team for creating a stunning exhibition fitting for such a work of art, and I am in no doubt that Penelope and Bess would have been very pleased with the result! The exhibition officially opened 18th June so if you can come and have a look for yourselves!

Bess' coat of arms

Bess’ coat of arms

The next Great Hanging to head to Norfolk is Lucretia. Lucretia’s story does not have the happy ending Penelope’s does, but luckily the embroidery will have a happy ending and return to us as beautiful as the first now looks! Having seen Penelope’s transformation I cannot wait to see the four virtuous ladies on display, conserved and looking fab. However that is some way off yet so I will have to follow Penelope’s example and be patient.

Hammer, Nail, Stone, Scaffolding – It’s Art!

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So this month is probably the busiest month at Hardwick since, I don’t know, the month Bess moved in! We have so many huge projects and events happening I have never been so shattered at the end of a week … Continue reading

Bonny Bakewell

Recently I went on a little jolly to Bakewell for the day (the joys of now having a car!) and it such a beautiful place to spend the day I think I might be popping over there more often  to make the most of sunny days! It is full of lots of picturesque little cottages and cute gift shops and vintage shops as well as some interesting sights to explore.

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I had a friend visiting and we decided to visit the Old House Museum at Bakewell since it has recently been voted Derbyshire Museum of the Year.

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It was an interesting, if a bit odd, very typical of a local life museum in that it had bits of everything on display; including a rat’s skeleton, 1940’s artefacts, lace, clothing, lanterns, a barber’s pole, and lots of scarily life-like mannequins! Some of my favorite bits were the lace making room and furniture including a really nice chest in one of the other rooms.

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Now when I visit museums or other heritage sites I spend just as much time looking at the way they interpret and present their collection as I do looking at the collection itself, but i find it really interesting and like to try and get inspiration wherever I can. However I am definitely not sold on the idea of having mannequins in every room. I wouldn’t want to wander around in the dark, alone, if there were! (Too much Dr Who when I was a child).

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The building was beautiful, and had been extended in a rather higgly-piggldy manner, with rooms being added on where they were need without much though into the future, often blocking off doors or staircases.

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The Museum is at the top of Bakewell so on our way back to the main street we walked though the church yard, which has some really interesting headstones in it.

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Then, after all that exertion we stopped and had the most delicious strawberry milkshake from a lovely little cafe called ‘Naughty & Nice’ in a square of old cottages that now mostly contain craft shops. I couldn’t resist having a peak in the the cute haberdashers too! I may have to go back just for the milkshakes (I asked but they don’t deliver to Chesterfield).

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Then we caught the scent of a chippie and had to get a tray of chips to eat by the river before heading back home. I’m looking forward to being able to explore more of the local sights now I’m mobile, and find out more about the history of the local area.
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Even more matting!

Recently we had even more of our rush matting replaced, this time in the State Withdrawing Room.

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The New Matting

This room houses some of our finest pieces of carved wooden furniture, including the beautiful Sea Dog Table that visitors can walk all the way round. This does however cause extra wear on our floors, and the tape patches here have been getting more and more extensive.

The deconstructed Table

The deconstructed Table

Before we could remove the old matting we had to move most of the furniture in the room, including said Sea Dog Table, which breaks down into 17 separate pieces. We moved the pieces into the Green Velvet Bedroom and lay them out on the floor there. Visitors were really interested in seeing it deconstructed so we have now put a photo out in the room.

One of the Sea Dogs

One of the Sea Dogs

The same company who did the High Great Chamber for us came back for a (long) day with three rolls of brand new matting to install! Here is a link to the company we use: http://www.rushmatters.co.uk

Clearing the old matting

Clearing the old matting

We removed the old matting in two pieces and had three rolls of brand new dancing to replace them. As well as the new matting in the center we decided to turn the piece of matting to the side of this, so that the least worn edge could be sewn to the new matting strips. This meant moving an awful lot of furniture but will hopefully be worth it in the long run.

Sewing the new matting

Sewing the new matting

Turning the rush matting is something we can do to try to help a piece last as long as possible, moving worn pieces from the areas that get the most wear. Now our beautiful Sea Dog Table is framed by nice new matting that will hopefully last for many more feet to come!

The room renewed

The room renewed

Hardwick’s very own (Para)Parade

Once upon a time Hardwick Estate was used as a base to train Paratroopers during the Second World War. I heard a tale that it was thanks to a conversation between Winston Churchill and the Duke of Devonshire where Churchill mentions his ambition to create a unit of paratroopers. The duke promptly offered up Hardwick and so in 1941 the Estate became home to the 1st Parachute Brigade. How true that story is I’m not sure, but it’s a funny little tale so I thought I would share anyway.

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Every year to commemorate the service of the troops that lived and trained here there is a ‘Para-Parade’ through the Estate. Men who actually trained here and new members of the same same regiment marched from the North Orchard through to the Stable Yard. This year was an extra special celebration due to it being the 70th anniversary of the Normandy Landings.

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However, before the parade can begin they have to wait for the signal, a fly-over from a Douglas C-47 Dakota Military Transport Aircraft! I was very excited about this and got to go up on the roof to see it and take some photos. The Dakota planes were used from from 1941 to transport troops and supplies, and for brave paratroopers to jump from. It wasn’t quite as noisy as I had expected but really thrilling to see it flying right above our heads.

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As well as the Paras old and new we had re-enactors in the Stable Yard, and they brought along lots of interesting toys. I had to go out and have a bit of a nosy and of course take a few piccies. If I was ever tempted away from Medieval re-enactment I would love to try WWII so I really enjoyed chatting with the re-enactors and finding out about what the men experienced while they did their training on the estate, and after they jumped!

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All the kit displayed below was carried by one paratrooper, who was expected to be able to complete a 7 mile hike whilst carrying all this in less than 1 hour 30 mins! Working at Hardwick I am the fittest I have ever been but I’m not sure I could manage 30 steps with all that strapped to me! I was quite amused to see that among the essentials there was a shaving kit included, as well as Oxo cubes and chocolate! (something I’ve always personally considered an essential)

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It was a really exciting weekend, helped by the beautiful weather and I was so glad to be there to join in all the fun!

A Stunning Schloss – Neuchwanstein Castle

Whilst on my recent holiday to Germany with my family I got to visit the most beautiful fairy tale castle I have ever seen, straight out of a children’s book; Neuschwanstein Castle. The castle was built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria, who had a very sad life, and was never finished due to his suspicious death at only 41. He dedicated the castle to Wagner, the composer, and each of the rooms was themed around one of the stories from his operas.

The first glimpse of Neuschwanstein Castle

The first glimpse of Neuschwanstein Castle

King Ludwig

King Ludwig II of Bavaria

Ludwig became King when he was only 18 after his father, King Maximilian II, passed away. He had not been very close to his father but tried to be a good king and despite his eccentricity and real dislike of  public gatherings he was popular with the people. Unfortunately the ministers wanted a puppet King that they could control and Ludwig’s independent mind stood in the way of their plans.

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King Maximilian's Castle

King Maximilian’s Castle

To retreat from the pressures of office Ludwig began building fairy tale retreats, he built several castles before starting Neuschwanstein Castle in 1869. He never completed it. In 1886 the ministers declared Ludwig insane in a bid to gain control once and for all. He was taken from Neuschwanstein to Berg Palace. The next day King Ludwig and the psychiatrist that had declared him insane were found drowned in Lake Starnberg and his younger brother Otto, who was considered insane, succeeded him.

The view on the walk up

The view on the walk up

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To get to the castle you have to make your way up the mountain to it. You can walk (about 15-20 minutes), get a coach or go by horse and cart. We walked up, a really beautiful walk, and down again, taking a detour to a bridge where you can get a really good shot of the castle perched on the mountain side.

Me on the bridge

Me on the bridge

Every room that had been finished on the top floor was decorated so highly, stunning embroidery and acres of gilding and brightly coloured walls. It took a team of carpenters 4 months to carve the wooden furniture in his bedroom but the end result was more that worth it. Every corner you turned just took your breath away. Completely over the top but completely amazing. A tremendous amount of imagination and work for what would have been the most stunning fairy tale home!

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The opportune photo point

Due to how much the building of the castle cost the government decided to open it to tourists only month’s after the King’s death, and you could see where many of the objects had been handled, and chairs sat on before conservation measures were put in place. Now the castle is only open by time guided tour, and each of the rooms has perspex walls inside the main walls, to protect the furnishings and decorations from sustaining any more damage.

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The oddest part of the day was visiting the gift shop. There are several souvenir shops on the walk up to the castle from the car park and more gift shops after you leave the guided tour, and they sell the usual sort of thing, including postcards, t-shirts, key rings, mugs ect with people relevant to the castle’s history on them. So there were souvenirs featuring King Ludwig, Charles Wagner and one particular woman in a very beautiful ball gown. However could we find any information on this woman during our visit? No. Her name was given on the merchandise she was featured on but that was all we could find. She was not mentioned on the tour, nor in either of the books we purchased in the shop.

http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/franz-xaver-winterhalter/elizabeth-empress-of-austria-1865

Elisabeth, Empress of Austria

After a bit of googling I found out that her name is Elisabeth, Empress of Austria, also know as Sisi. She was King Ludwig’s cousin and close friend, but it it is not clear if she ever visited it, I can’t find any information one way or the other. I can’t find a reason why she is so heavily featured in the gift shop but not mentioned during the tour. Maybe it’s just a case of every good castle needing its own pretty princess. But maybe there is more to it that than, I know if I was friends with someone who owned such a magnificent castle I would try and make sure I got to visit!

Inside the Castle Courtyard

Inside the Castle Courtyard

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This is the castle that Walt Disney took as inspiration for Sleeping Beauty’s castle, which can be found in every Disney Land/World. And you can see why he did, it is the most stunning looking castle in such a mind-blowingly beautiful location! And the interiors match the exterior for beauty. You weren’t allowed to take photos inside, but you can find images on google if you want to have a look.

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Neuschwanstein Castle has to be the most beautiful castle I have ever visited, I would love to get to spend some more time there, just staring at the amazing decor and discovering the stories painted on the walls. As I was on the tour I couldn’t help but think how much I would enjoy working there and getting to clean that collection(weird I know), with all the intricately carved furniture and stunning embroidery. It’s honestly the sort of place that could tempt me out of the country. So that completes post number two about my European Adventures! Stay tuned for more :P